Post Medical Job

Do you have a permanent (full-time or part-time) opening for a high-quality medical specialist? Click Here to post More »

Post Your Resume Here

Are you a healthcare professional working long 12 -14 hour days, too many weekends and holidays, or traveling too far from home? Are you not home for dinner usually or not able to spend enough quality time with your family More »

About US

NSI Healthcare Recruiters is one of the most trusted and reliable recruitment and placement services available to medical professionals in the USA. NSI has been in business for over 29 years and has assisted many healthcare providers in locating and hiring qualified medical professionals. More »

Contact Us

Candidates: Because our posted healthcare jobs are filled quickly we ask that you contact us for the latest updates. Employers: Please post your job here for affordable placement service. More »

Health-Care-Recruiter.com

We at Health-Care-Recruiter.com pride ourselves on the highest quality, personalized-service that medical facilities and medical job applicants alike have come to expect from us. pride ourselves on the highest quality, personalized-service that medical facilities and medical job applicants alike have come to expect from us. More »

 

Daily Archives: August 28, 2013

What is neutropenia? What causes neutropenia?

Neutropenia is a blood condition, a granulocyte disorder, that characterized by a deficiency of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell that defends the body against bacterial and fungal infections. Granulocytes are a category of white blood cells. They are made in bone marrow. They contain microscopic granules with proteins (enzymes) that digest invading bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites and play a key role in our immune system response…

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

FAQ: Grandfathered Health Plans

You’ve probably read a lot about how the Affordable Care Act is going to change health insurance, but does it all apply to you? If you get your insurance from your employer, there’s a very good chance that you are in a “grandfathered plan,” and that means some of the changes do not affect you — yet.

Framers of the Affordable Care Act allowed some health plans to be exempt from some of the law’s rules and protections in the interests of a smooth transition and to allow businesses and individuals to keep current policies without having to make substantial changes. Almost half of all Americans who get insurance through their jobs are enrolled in such plans, although that number is expected to decline every year.

Nonetheless, consumers should know the status of their plans since that may determine whether they are eligible for certain protections and benefits created by the health law.  For example, an employee at a large company may wonder why his job-based insurance doesn’t include the free preventive services he’s heard about. Or someone who purchases her own coverage may wonder whether she will be eligible for broader benefits when new insurance marketplaces open next fall. To answer those questions, you must understand the status of your plan and how grandfathering works.  Here are the basics:

What is a grandfathered plan?

Most health insurance plans that existed on March 23, 2010 are eligible for grandfathered status and therefore do not have to meet all the requirements of the health care law.  But if an insurer or employer makes significant changes to a plan’s benefits or how much members pay through premiums, copays or deductibles, then the plan loses that status. 

The government’s regulations spell out how much plans can change the amount paid by workers or employers before losing their status.

Both individual plans, the kind you buy on your own, and group plans, the kind you receive through an employer, can be grandfathered. If you get coverage through an employer, you can join a grandfathered plan even if you weren’t enrolled on March 23, 2010.

What rules does a grandfathered plan have to follow?

A grandfathered plan has to follow some of the same rules other plans do under the ACA.  For example, the plans cannot impose lifetime limits on how much health care coverage people may receive, and they must offer dependent coverage for young adults until age 26 (although until 2014, a grandfathered group plan does not have to offer such coverage if a young adult is eligible for coverage elsewhere). They also cannot retroactively cancel your coverage because of a mistake you made when applying, a practice known as a rescission.

However, there are many rules grandfathered plans do not have to follow. For example, they are not required to provide preventive care without cost-sharing.  In addition, they do not have to offer a package of “essential health benefits” that individual and small group plans must offer beginning in 2014.  (Large employer plans are not required to offer the essential benefits package even if they are not grandfathered.)

Furthermore, grandfathered individual plans – the policies you purchase yourself, rather than through work – can still impose annual dollar limits, such as capping key benefits at $750,000 in a given year. Grandfathered individual policies also can still lock out children under 19 if they have a pre-existing conditions.

How many people are enrolled in grandfathered plans?

In 썝, 36 percent of those who get coverage through their jobs are enrolled in a grandfathered health plan, down from 48 percent in 2012 and 56 percent in 2011, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s most recent Employer Health Benefits Survey. (KHN is an editorially-independent program of KFF.) 

The survey also found that 54 percent of firms that offered health insurance reported that they offered at least one health care plan with grandfathered status, down from 58 percent of firms that did so in 2012 and 72 percent in 2011.

Fewer covered workers at large firms (200 or more workers) are enrolled in a grandfathered health plan than covered workers at smaller firms (30 percent vs. 49 percent).

More plans are expected to lose grandfathered status over time. 

How do I find out if I’m in a grandfathered plan?

It is very difficult to determine a plan’s grandfathered status simply by reading the plan materials.  If you want to know more about your coverage, your best bet is to ask your insurance company or your employer’s human resources department.

But it’s important to remember that simply knowing a plan’s status doesn’t reveal everything you need to know about what kind of coverage you and your family have, according to Larry Levitt, a senior vice president at KFF, who has written about grandfathered plans. 

“It’s not clear-cut at all,” he said.  For example, if your plan loses grandfathered status, then you could gain additional benefits, such as preventive care without cost-sharing.  However, the plan may have lost that status because it reduced benefits or increased costs which could matter more to your care and to your bottom line.

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Real World Data & Analytics Forum, November 12 – 13, 2013 at the Princeton Marriott in Forrestal, Princeton, N.J.

EXL Pharma provides a much-needed forum for pharma and medical device professionals to discuss real world solutions to pharma’s big data challenges in clinical trials, R&D and business intelligence ExL Pharma, the industry leader in educational life science conferences, have announced the lineup for its Real World Data & Analytics Forum, taking place November 12 – 13, 2013 at the Princeton Marriott in Forrestal, Princeton, N.J…

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

'Majority' of stroke patients might have undiagnosed attention disorders

The majority of stroke patients may have attention disorders, most of which are not diagnosed, according to a study published in the journal Neurology. Researchers from Imperial College London in the UK analyzed絮 patients who were being treated for stroke at London’s Charing Cross Hospital, alongside 62 participants who had not suffered from stroke. Five of the stroke patients had already been diagnosed with an attention disorder called “neglect” – a deficit of attention and awareness in one side of the body…

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Scientists discover drug that could combat migraines

Researchers have discovered a new compound that could potentially treat migraines by blocking light sensors in the eyes, according to a study published in the journal Nature Chemical Biology. Researchers from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have found that a series of compounds called opsinamides can block a receptor in the eye called melanopsin – a receptor found in neurons connecting the eyes and the brain. The researchers discovered 10 years ago that melanopsin is responsible for sensing light on its own, away from normal vision…

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Salt intake controlled by brain, not diet

Reducing salt consumption has been recommended to help manage cardiovascular disease and high blood pressure, based on the idea that our sodium intake exceeds the needs of our body. But a study led by scientists at UC-Davis lends credence to a recent finding that sodium intake is controlled by networks in the brain, not by the salt we consume. The current US sodium guidelines for healthy individuals are no more than 2,3Ǡ mg per day, while for those at risk of heart disease, the recommended level is no more than 1,500 mg per day…

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Survey: Big Business May Shift Retirees, Part-Timers To Insurance Exchanges

Corporate America is taking a hard look at moving retirees and part-time workers into health insurance marketplaces created by the Affordable Care Act, suggests a survey by the National Business Group on Health.

To a lesser extent large companies also expect coverage for their full-time workers employee spouses to shift to the online, state-based marketplaces known as exchanges, according to the annual survey published Wednesday.

“They see the exchanges as logical places for them,” NBGH President Helen Darling said in an interview, portraying the change as adding diversity and stability to the marketplaces. “These are people that public policymakers wanted to get into the pool.”

The survey was done before the Obama administration delayed until 2015 the requirement that large employers offer coverage to certain workers, the group cautioned, so some plans may have changed.

NBGH, an association of large employers offering what are often substantial medical benefits, polled its membership about their plans for 2014. Of 360 members, 108 responded, most with more than 10,000 employees each. The findings are likely to add to the discussion about whether the Affordable Care Act will erode traditional, employer-based coverage. 

NBGH asked whether employers expected various groups “who may currently be covered by your plans will choose public exchange coverage when it becomes available in 2014.”

While 40 percent predicted no change, a fifth of those responding expected part-time workers to buy exchange plans next year. The health law does not require employer coverage for those who work less than 30 hours a week.

A fourth anticipated that retirees too young for Medicare and still on the company plan could choose exchange coverage in 2014.

An even greater percentage — 41 percent — figured former employees on the company plan under COBRA provisions would buy instead in the subsidized online exchanges next year.

The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of the 1980s allows workers to maintain company coverage even after they leave their jobs by paying the premiums themselves. Before the health act outlawed discrimination in the individual insurance market against those with preexisting illness (starting next year), ex-employees often relied on COBRA while unemployed.

A smaller but still substantial number of respondents expected active employees and spouses now on company plans to seek exchange coverage next year. Companies contemplating such a move often plan to give employees money now spent on the corporate plan to buy into the marketplaces, analysts say.

Fifteen percent of the employers in the NBGH survey saw spouses or other dependents shifting to the online marketplaces next year; 12 percent saw full-time workers making the switch.

Last week Kaiser Health News reported that United Parcel Service would drop about 15,000 working, white-collar spouses from its company plan next year but would continue to cover nonworking spouses.

While large employers are barred from buying on state exchanges at least until 2017, their workers and dependents could buy plans as individuals.   

Big corporations are also looking closely at private health insurance exchanges for employees and retirees. Like the public ACA exchanges, private exchanges offer an online menu of comparable policies for consumers to choose from.

Private exchanges are offered only to a limited set of potential members, however — say, employees and retirees at select companies. They also lack the public exchanges’ government subsidies.

About a third of the companies in the NBGH poll are considering moving employees into private exchanges, promoted for their potential to control costs by fostering more choices in the employer-sponsored insurance market.

“At this point it’s still mostly interest,” Darling said. “There’s a lot of talk.”

She expects quicker adoption, however, of private exchanges for retirees.

Nearly half the companies are considering shifting retirees into private exchanges next year or later. Ten percent have already done it.

The idea is gaining traction. So few people had heard of private exchanges that NBGH didn’t include them in last year’s survey. Since then Aon Hewitt and others have announced the creation of private exchanges, sharply raising interest, Darling said.

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Deadline Reportedly Delayed For Finalizing Details With Insurance Plans On Federal Exchanges

Reuters reports these agreements are not likely to be signed until mid-September. Also in the news, the race is on to train navigators while, in Washington state, Group Health makes a decision about abortion coverage in exchange plans. And Republicans on Capitol Hill offer a new plan for insuring government officials.  

Reuters: Deadline For Finalizing Obamacare Health Plans
The Obama administration has delayed a step crucial to the launch of the new healthcare law, the signing of final agreements with insurance plans to be sold on federal health insurance exchanges starting October 1. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notified insurance companies on Tuesday that it would not sign final agreements with the plans between September 5 and 9, as originally anticipated, but would wait until mid-September instead, according to insurance industry sources. … Nevertheless, Joanne Peters, a spokeswoman for HHS, said the department remains “on track to open” the marketplaces on time on October 1. The reason for the hold-up was unclear. Sources attributed it to technology problems involving the display of insurance products within the federal information technology system (Morgan and Humer, 8/28).

Kansas Health Institute: Weeks Before Obamacare Marketplace Launch, Race Is On To Train Navigators
With open enrollment scheduled to start in about five weeks, the race is on to train workers to help residents around the region obtain health insurance through marketplaces established under the federal health reform law commonly referred to as Obamacare (Sherry, 8/27).

The Seattle Times: Group Health To Omit Abortion Coverage On Plans Sold On State Exchange
Group Health Cooperative will not cover abortion in its individual health-insurance plans being offered through the marketplace put in place by the Affordable Care Act, but says women who buy them will be able to access the service without paying more. Group Health said it made the decision not to include the coverage because of murky regulations about how it would have to account for federal money in plans that offered abortion (Ostrom, 8/27).

Politico: Mike Enzi, David Vitter Aim To Put More Government Officials In Exchanges
Two Republican senators plan to take aim at a recent agreement on Hill health coverage, saying they will introduce legislation requiring the president, vice president, political appointees, members of Congress and their staffs to buy insurance on the exchanges — including those currently exempted under the law. Sens. Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.) and David Vitter (R-La.) said their legislation would also ban everyone in that group from receiving any federal contributions to their health plans — except for congressional staffers (Cunningham, 8/27).

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Sarah Palin Signs Up To Boost 'Defund Obamacare' Effort

Former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin backs a GOP plan against Obamacare. Meanwhile, battles over funding continue as both sides try to speak louder than the other.

Politico: Sarah Palin Backs Defunding Obamacare
Sarah Palin on Tuesday announced she has signed onto the effort to defund Obamacare, calling it a “beast” that must be stopped. “Forced enrollment in Obama’s ‘Unaffordable Care Act’ is weeks away,” the former Alaska governor and GOP vice presidential nominee said in a statement. “This beast must be stopped — by not funding it. Today, Todd and I joined with many of our fellow citizens to urge those in the U.S. Senate to not fund Obamacare. We the people must continue to make our voices heard and hold those elected to serve this great nation accountable” (Weinger, 8/27).

CNN: Palin Jumps Onto Defund Obamacare Effort
Palin said she was signing onto a petition from the group for the defund Obamacare effort. Backed by Senators Ted Cruz of Texas, Mike Lee of Utah, and Marco Rubio of Florida, the effort presses Republican lawmakers to pledge their opposition to any government funding measure that also funds the Affordable Care Act. … Many Republicans oppose the tactic, saying even the threat of a government shutdown could alienate voters who are tired of partisan bickering over the nation’s finances (Liptak, 8/27).

CNNDefund Obamacare Supporters Target Top Republicans
Conservatives backing a move to shut down the federal government if funding isn’t cut off for President Barack Obama’s health care law by the end of September are launching a tour starting Tuesday to put pressure on leading Republicans in Congress. The first target of the push by Tea Party Patriots and ForAmerica is Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. The groups are planning a news conference in Lexington, Kentucky, Tuesday, near McConnell’s offices (Steinhauser, 8/27).

The Associated Press: Dems, Conservatives Line Up On Health Care Fight
Supporters and opponents of the federal health care law brought their national battle to Indianapolis on Monday. Heritage Foundation President Jim DeMint was scheduled to rally conservatives against it Monday night, while the liberal Americans for United Change organized a Statehouse news conference to seek support for the law earlier in the day (Lobianco, 8/27).

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Michigan Senate Approves Expansion Of Medicaid

The vote was a victory for Republican Gov. Rick Snyder, who pushed for passage, bucking the sentiments of many in his party. It is now all but certain that nearly half a million residents will gain coverage when Michigan joins the list of states opting to expand the program under the federal health law.

The Wall Street Journal: Michigan Senate Votes To Expand Medicaid
Michigan lawmakers voted to extend Medicaid eligibility to hundreds of thousands of low-income adults in the state after a late legislative session Tuesday, in a boost for the Obama administration as it seeks to roll out its health law this fall. The vote was a victory for Republican Gov. Rick Snyder, who had struggled to persuade GOP legislators in his state to implement a major provision of the health law, which faced strong opposition from his party. The GOP-led state Senate voted 20-18 to expand the Medicaid program in line with the provisions of the federal Affordable Care Act (Radnofsky and Kesling,ň/27).

The New York Times: Medicaid Expansion Battle In Michigan Ends In Passage
Mr. Snyder’s preferred bill — one he had lobbied for intensely for months — initially fell short by one vote, but the governor salvaged a deal hours later. The vote in the Republican-controlled Senate was 20 to 18, with only 8 Republicans in favor. The Michigan House, which had earlier approved a similar measure, will need to vote on the Senate version before Mr. Snyder can sign the bill (Davey, 8/27).

Politico: Michigan Moves Toward Medicaid Change
It’s now a near-certainty that a version of Medicaid expansion will land on the desk of Snyder, who had already broken with the GOP base to support the Obamacare program. Supporters say expansion will provide nearly half a million Michiganders with basic health insurance coverage. The federal dollars will also reach a state dealing with the fallout from Detroit’s bankruptcy (Millman and Cheney, 8/27).

Detroit Free Press: Medicaid Expansion Passes After Heated Politicking; 470,000 More Michiganders To Get Coverage
It took two votes and eight hours of mostly closed-door politicking and vote wrangling, but the state Senate approved a plan late Tuesday to expand Medicaid health care coverage to 470,000 low-income Michiganders. The historic 20-18 vote makes Michigan the 25th state in the nation to go ahead with the Medicaid expansion as part of the federal Affordable Care Act, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. Five more states are debating the issue and 21 have decided not to go ahead with the expansion (Gray, 8/27).

The Associated Press:: GOP-Led Mich. Senate Approves Medicaid Expansion
The GOP governor, who strongly supports Medicaid expansion, had struggled to win backing in a Senate where many conservatives opposed to “Obamacare” have philosophical objections to expanding government. “It’s about helping 470,000 Michiganders have a better life,” Snyder said during a Capitol news conference after the vote. “Going to the ER for your health care, while we have wonderful people in the ER, is not a good solution” (Eggert, 8/27).

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS