Post Medical Job

Do you have a permanent (full-time or part-time) opening for a high-quality medical specialist? Click Here to post More »

Post Your Resume Here

Are you a healthcare professional working long 12 -14 hour days, too many weekends and holidays, or traveling too far from home? Are you not home for dinner usually or not able to spend enough quality time with your family More »

About US

NSI Healthcare Recruiters is one of the most trusted and reliable recruitment and placement services available to medical professionals in the USA. NSI has been in business for over 29 years and has assisted many healthcare providers in locating and hiring qualified medical professionals. More »

Contact Us

Candidates: Because our posted healthcare jobs are filled quickly we ask that you contact us for the latest updates. Employers: Please post your job here for affordable placement service. More »

Health-Care-Recruiter.com

We at Health-Care-Recruiter.com pride ourselves on the highest quality, personalized-service that medical facilities and medical job applicants alike have come to expect from us. pride ourselves on the highest quality, personalized-service that medical facilities and medical job applicants alike have come to expect from us. More »

 

Monthly Archives: October 2013

Why State Exchange Sites Worked While The Federal Site Faltered

When President Obama addressed massive problems with the federal health-insurance exchange website last week, he couldn’t cite any actual enrollments in health plans offered through the site.

At the same time, several states running their own exchanges have exceeded federal-enrollment targets, including California, Connecticut, Kentucky, New York, Rhode Island and Washington. As of Oct. 28, Washington’s online site — the Washington Healthplanfinder — had enrolled 48,995 people.

What accounts for the different experiences of the state and federally managed exchanges? Why are the exchanges that the federal government runs so bug-ridden, subjecting users to long delays and possibly even more serious problems?

The federal agency managing the exchange — the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) — did not respond to queries about the nature of the problems.

And the federal exchange’s primary contractor, CGI, declined to comment.

But in testimony before the House Ways and Means Committee on Tuesday, CMS administrator Marilyn Tavenner acknowledged the serious problems that have afflicted the online effort, and she targeted outside contractors as the source of the problems.

“CMS has a track record of successfully overseeing the many contractors our programs depend on to function,” she said in document provided in advance. “Unfortunately, a subset of those contracts for HealthCare.gov have not met expectations.”

Still, even if many of the details of the problems are still unknown, consultants and state technology officials say there are important lessons to be learned from a comparison.

Complexity of scope

Some analysts argue that the complexity of doing the job at the federal level is just too great.

Under the Affordable Care Act, states that chose not to create their own exchanges are to use an exchange set up by the federal government — Healthcare.gov. Thirty-six states chose not to create their own exchange.

The federal system must be capable of integrating with multiple-state eligibility databases.

“It’s just the complexity of their scope vs. ours,” said Curt Kwak, chief information officer of the Washington Health Benefit Exchange, the public-private corporation that manages Healthplanfinder. “We focus on just one state, but they are having to focus on 36 states. It’s just that much more complex.”

Robert Booz, an analyst with consulting group Gartner’s health-care-industry research unit, noted that each state has different computer equipment, different software and different bureaucratic structures. Tying them all together, Booz said, “was an incredibly complex, very short-fuse situation. If this was a corporation putting in a billing system in essentially six months with scope changes up until a month before, you could see all the earmarks of it being a disaster. This was a big, difficult, complex implementation.”

According to Kwak, his team benefited from being able to focus solely on the issues peculiar to Washington state. That meant, of course, building a clean consumer website and preparing for integration with the federal Data Services Hub, a data center managed by CMS that provides one connection to the common federal data sources (including the Social Security Administration and the Internal Revenue Service) to verify consumer application information for income, citizenship and immigration status.

But the trickiest part, Kwak said, was integrating the state eligibility system, which tracks services — including Medicaid — that residents are eligible to receive. The state decided to build that leg of the system from scratch.

“Our Department of Social and Health Services actually had to build a platform that connected to our health-benefit exchange,” he said.

The state’s choice was much like that of a person who decides to tear down a house and rebuild from scratch, rather than go the renovation route. It’s a lot more work and expense upfront, but you end up with modern wiring and other useful amenities.

Kwak said eliminating legacy hardware and out-of-date software has made it easier to integrate the state eligibility system both with the website and the federal data hub. As a result, while the links between the federal exchange and state databases have been plagued with problems, Washington’s exchange has had no major problems linking to its own eligibility system.

Closer to home

Another advantage to implementing Affordable Care Act portals at the state level, say analysts, is proximity to those with a stake in the system: insurers, state eligibility departments and consumers.

“At the state level, some already have direct state experience with the CIOs on the health-care side of the state government,” Booz said. “And just the knowledge of how the state interfaces with Medicaid puts exchanges a step ahead.”

Keeping control over the project closer to home is also important in managing contractors. While the federal exchange has used 55 outside contractors, Washington’s team worked with only three, two of which were hired specifically to help ensure compliance of the primary contractor.

Just as important, says Benush Venugopal, an analyst with Deloitte, Washington exchange’s primary contractor, “Our office was literally a block away.”

“In any sort of large, complex implementation like this, where there is not a whole lot of time to get things done, the more closely you are working together, the less room there is for communication gaps,” Venugopal said

Booz suspects that in addition to the problem of managing large numbers of widely scattered contractors, the federal effort may have been complicated by political considerations.

“At the federal level, it appears to be that the vendors may have been more hesitant to alert the sponsor of problems because of the politics and the optics of it,” Booz said.

Another apparent weakness in the federal effort was the lack of a single point of authority and responsibility with hands-on control over the project.

“We sometimes use the term a ‘single throat to choke,’” Booz said. “That encompasses the idea of having a single source of truth when it comes to decision-making around the scope of a project.”

Having a single throat to choke can be important because in any project involving multiple agencies, as well as consumers and private business, there are going to be competing interests.

At the state level, the competitors are familiar with each other. “Vendors with some experience with the particular regulators of the state, they sort of know where each other is going,” Booz said. “It’s like a dating dance.”

At the federal level, especially because the federal exchange has to accommodate different conditions in 36 individual states, that dance is more complex.

It’s not that state efforts haven’t had their problems. “We knew it was going to be difficult for everybody and it has been,” Kwak said.

Pointing to the technical issues that brought down the Washington state website for two days after its Oct. 1 launch, Kwak said that “even those bumps on the first day of launch didn’t really surprise us.”

The most recent “bump” to afflict the Washington exchange occurred last week, when it was discovered that the exchange site’s calculator had misestimated premiums for approximately 8,000 applicants. When applicants entered their monthly incomes, the federal site read it as yearly income and estimated a higher-than-warranted subsidy. Kwak’s team fixed the problem within 24 hours.

Still, the federal exchange’s struggles have been greater than those of the state exchanges. Yet Booz is confident the system will be fixed.

“It will muddle along,” he predicted. “It will take a considerable amount of effort and a lot of time to get this fixed. It’s not going to be completely resolved before the March 31 effective date. Patches will be put in. It will work a bit better. But at some point they’ve got to release version 2.0.”

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Florida Insurer Says It Didn't Drop Customers, Just Insurance Plans

Hundreds of thousands of Floridians are currently afflicted with something critics of the Affordable Care Act long have warned about: rate shock. It’s the unpleasant experience of seeing your health insurance rates jump as a result of the healthcare reform law — in contradiction with President Barack Obama’s often-repeated promise that, “If you like your plan, you can keep it.”

This month, Florida Blue, the state’s largest and oldest health insurer, notified 300,000 members that when their plans expire in 2014 they must enroll in new plans that comply with requirements of the ACA that insurers offer coverage to everyone, regardless of pre-existing conditions, and that plans cover 10 “essential health benefits’’ such as hospitalization, prescription drugs and maternity care.

Florida Blue executives insist the company isn’t dropping the members — it’s only dropping their plans, which no longer qualify under the law.

“We’re not terminating anyone’s coverage,’’ said Jon Urbanek, Florida Blue’s senior vice president of commercial markets. “We’re essentially going to go through a transition to qualified plans.’’

It’s a distinction that some Florida Blue members have a hard time seeing — especially when the new plan costs more and offers benefits they don’t necessarily want.

But there are others — generally older, sicker people who had a harder time finding health insurance in the past because of pre-existing conditions — who welcome the change. A qualified plan is likely to lower their monthly premiums and improve their coverage. And still other members will experience little or no change in their costs or coverage level.

“Each individual will experience very different impacts,’’ said Douglas Lynch, vice president and chief actuary for Florida Blue.

Urbanek said that more than half of the estimated 200,000 individual and family policies affected by the change have comprehensive benefits comparable to those required under the health law.

But it’s unclear how many Florida Blue members will pay more and how many will pay less for their new, qualified plans, because an unknown number of those policy holders also may be eligible for federal financial aid to help pay their monthly premiums. That aid is available to individuals and families earning up to four times the federal poverty level, or $45,960 a year for an individual and $94,200 a year for a family of four.

Another factor affecting the cost of health insurance rates is the ACA itself, which requires that insurers now cover anyone who applies, even with a pre-existing condition — a requirement known as “guaranteed issue.”

“Guaranteed issue and no pre-existing conditions will impact practically all of our members,’’ Lynch said, “and represent a significant portion of the overall impact our members will experience.”

But it was the Florida cancellations, followed by complaints of rising prices, that caught the public’s attention, triggering another onslaught of criticism of the ACA. Obama had promised many times in 2008, 2009 and 2010 that Americans could keep their health insurance if they liked it.

What the president did not say, and what many Americans were unaware of, is that insurance companies could close those plans at their discretion, said Julie Bataille, press director for the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that oversees the public health programs and the online insurance exchange.

“There’s nothing in the healthcare law that makes insurers force people out of plans that they were enrolled in before the law,” she said. “The truth is that insurers are upgrading their plans.’’

But that’s only part of the truth. The rest? Only people enrolled in so-called “grandfathered” plans can keep their current health insurance plan, and even then only if the insurer chooses to continue that plan.

Urbanek said Florida Blue still covers about 30,000 individuals through grandfathered plans — defined as plans that existed before the enactment of the law in March 2010 and that have kept the same level of benefits, copayments and deductibles.

Individuals in Florida Blue’s grandfathered plans will not be transitioned into new, qualified health plans.

“Those folks can keep the plan that they have,’’ Urbanek said.

But Florida Blue is no longer enrolling new individuals into grandfathered plans, either.

Officials with Florida’s Office of Insurance Regulation said they do not know how many grandfathered plans exist in Florida, but that some insurers were closing those plans.

Florida Blue is not the only insurer moving members out of their old health insurance plans and into new, qualified plans. But Florida Blue is the leader in the state’s individual major medical health insurance market, which is where people who do not get healthcare coverage through an employer buy insurance if they can afford it.

In 2012, the state of Florida’s individual market accounted for $2.5 billion in direct premiums earned by insurers. Florida Blue earned $1.Ǩ billion, or 42 percent of the market, for covering纥,000 lives.

Some Florida Blue members say they were content with the old, more basic health insurance plans.

Anyoli Font, 29, of Hollywood, pays $45 a month for a Florida Blue limited benefits plan that covers her annual wellness visits and not much else. Then she received a letter telling her that her limited benefits plan expires Jan. 1. The new plan Florida Blue has recommended will cost about $250 to $280 a month.

If Font does not reply by Nov. 1, she said, Florida Blue will automatically enroll her in the qualified plan. But she doesn’t intend to let that happen.

“I’m going to get back to them and tell them I don’t want this,’’ said Font, who is a healthcare benefits administrator. “I do not need all that extra stuff.’’

Font said she bought a limited benefits plan from Florida Blue a few years ago to reduce her health insurance costs, which were rising annually.

She refused maternity care because she does not plan to have children, and she considers it “ridiculous” that she now has to buy a plan that includes pediatric dental benefits when she doesn’t even have a child.

“I’m pretty sure if I took that premium and put it into a bank account,’’ she said, “I would use less than if I paid for [health insurance] services.’’

Other Florida Blue members, though, are having the opposite experience: premiums are dropping. Typically, they are individuals who had trouble finding coverage on the individual market because of pre-existing conditions, were over 50 and basically were considered a bad bet for insurers.

Carolyn Newman, 50, of Plantation, was diagnosed with breast cancer in May 2006, about a month after she left her job with a nonprofit organization that provided an employee health insurance plan.

Newman said she had gap coverage provided through COBRA when she was diagnosed, and that she planned to join her husband’s individual health insurance plan with Florida Blue once her COBRA ran out.

But Newman’s pre-existing condition locked her out of the market.

“I was denied across the board,’’ she said. “Everywhere I went, no one would cover me.’’

Newman said she eventually enrolled in a high-risk pool plan run by Florida Blue, which has been her insurer since about 2007.

Her monthly premium has been $1,270. But after receiving a letter from Florida Blue, she learned that in January she’ll have a new health plan at a rate of $640 a month — about half her current rate.

Newman said her new plan has “all the same benefits” of her old plan, but with a lower deductible and no lifetime limit on benefits. She said it has higher copayments for some services and lower copayments for others.

Overall, she feels liberated by the change.

“For me, $640 is a lot of money,’’ Newman said, “but it is a hell of a lot less than what I was paying because I was hostage to what I could get. I’m not a hostage anymore. If I choose to use the Internet and shop around, I can’t be denied now.’’

Liz Buzone of Palmetto Bay never had trouble finding health insurance. Buzone gets coverage through her employer, but she buys individual policies from Florida Blue for her 16-year-old daughter and 12-year-old son.

Buzone said she pays $152 a month for her son’s plan, and $180 for her daughter’s plan. When she got her Florida Blue notice in the mail, the prices had gone up — to $170 a month for her son and $200 a month for her daughter — but she’s pleased because her children will get better coverage, including pediatric dental and vision plans.

But her copayments for doctor visits will increase from $ǹ to $80, and her deductible is also higher. “When I look at it,’’ she said of the health plans, “I think you gain some, and lose somewhere else.’’

Still Buzone noted that in the past, her health insurance costs rose every year and benefits decreased.

“To me, this a $15-to-$20 dollar increase. I’ve had more than that for the past seven years,’’ she said. “Every year, it went up $30 or more. Every year I lost a little bit more. The deductible would be higher, or the copay would be higher. So it was never for a better plan. It was always going to go up.’’

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Obesity linked to breast cancer cell growth and tumor size

New research suggests that the obesity status of a woman may determine the rate of breast cancer cell growth and tumor size. This is according to a study published in the journal Breast Cancer Research. Obesity is known to be a major risk factor for breast cancer in post-menopausal women, say researchers from the Tulane School of Medicine in New Orleans, LA. According to a previous study published in JAMA of more than Ȱ,000 registered nurses, women who gained 55 pounds or more after the age of 18 were found to have a 50% increased risk of developing breast cancer…

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Brain chemical may help treat jet lag

A new study in mice finds that at high doses, VIP, a molecule that normally synchronizes biological clock cells in the brain, knocks them out of synch, allowing them to reset quickly to a new light-dark cycle. The researchers – from Washington University in St. Louis, MO, and the University of California, Santa Barbara – suggest the finding may help develop treatments for sleep problems brought on by jet lag and shift work…

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Human decomposition: study maps internal bacteria

We may not be so different from zombies when we die, after all. A new study analyzing bacterial communities involved in the decomposition of corpses illustrates how a cadaver becomes a living, thriving ecosystem for microorganisms. The study, published recently in PLOS ONE, reveals that the type of bacteria embroiled in human decomposition can change over time. Researchers from Sam Houston State University and Baylor College of Medicine – both in Texas – say that until now, little has been known about the bacterial diversity involved in breaking down a corpse…

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Understanding the difference between "human smart" and "computer smart"

A common assumption in the cognitive sciences is that thinking consists of following sets of rules (as it does in a computer). A recent research paper published in Elsevier journal Cognition argues that unlike digital computers, which are designed to follow rules, the computations performed by the neural networks that make up our brain are inherently context dependent. People sometimes make seemingly strange mistakes like thinking that 798 is an odd number despite knowing how to identify odd and even numbers.Mistakes like this one can be dismissed as carelessness…

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Obama Offers Spirited Health Law Defense, Pledges To 'See It Through'

President Barack Obama, speaking in Boston, appeared “contrite” about health law difficulties, but he took a hard line against the continuing GOP criticism.

The New York Times: Contrite White House Spurns Health Law’s Critics
The White House on Wednesday blended expressions of contrition for the troubled rollout of its health care law with an aggressive rejection of Republican criticism of it, as the administration sought a political strategy to blunt the fallout from weeks of technical failures and negative coverage. While Kathleen Sebelius, the secretary of health and human services, apologized profusely during a politically charged hearing on Capitol Hill, President Obama traveled to Massachusetts to argue forcefully that the Affordable Care Act will eventually be just as successful as the similar plan pioneered by Mitt Romney, his onetime rival and a former governor of the state (Shear and Pear, 10/30).

Politico: Obamacare’s Split-Screen Day
President Barack Obama’s prescription for health care law critics: Take a deep breath — and move on. Never mind that House Republicans have beaten up on two of his top health officials on consecutive days; that one of them, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, faces new calls to resign seemingly every day; or that the Obamacare website crashed while Sebelius was testifying on the Hill Wednesday (Allen and Budoff Brown, 10/31).

The Washington Post: Obama On Health Care Law: ‘We Are Going To See It Through’
President Obama delivered a spirited defense of his health-care law Wednesday in the face of problems with the launch of its online insurance marketplace, vowing that “we are going to see it through.” In a speech in Boston, Obama took responsibility for making sure that problems with the Web site, HealthCare.gov, are fixed as soon as possible (Rucker and Branigin, 10/30).

The Associated Press/Washington Post: Obama Claims ‘Full Responsibility’ For Health Care Website Fixes As Security Concerns Surface
Obama underscored the administration’s unhappiness with the problems so far: “There’s no excuse for it,” he said during a Boston speech to promote his signature domestic policy achievement. “And I take full responsibility for making sure it gets fixed ASAP.” The website HealthCare.gov was still experiencing outages as Sebelius faced a new range of questions at the House Energy and Commerce Committee about a security memo from her department. It revealed that the troubled website was granted a temporary security certificate on Sept. 27, just four days before it went live on Oct. 1 (10/30).

Bloomberg: Obama Says Health Law Critics ‘Grossly Misleading’
President Barack Obama defended his health-care law, saying the flawed online insurance exchange will get fixed and accusing critics of “grossly misleading” the public about how the program works. Speaking at a rally in Boston yesterday, Obama said the experience of Massachusetts with the start of its health-care system in 2006 shows that the federal version, passed in 2010, will succeed (Talev, 10/31).

CBS News: Amid Obamacare Controversies, States Keep Up Medicaid Debate
As he defended his health care law in Boston on Wednesday, Mr. Obama criticized the Republican governors who’ve rejected the Medicaid expansion, charging they “are so locked into the politics of this thing that they won’t lift a finger to help their own people.” “That’s a shame,” Mr. Obama said. “If they put as much energy into making this thing work as they did into attacking the law, Americans would be better off” (Condon, 10/31).

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Budget Talks Proceed, But With The Same Old Sticking Points

Structural changes to federal health programs, the spending cuts put in place by the sequester and new taxes continue to be the buzz words.  

The Washington Post: Beneath Conference Committee’s Sweet Words Lurks Old Sticking Point: Taxes
Chastened by three years of budget showdowns and economic near-calamities, the 22 senators and seven House members on a new budget conference committee expressed fresh eagerness to end the era of government by crisis. Democrats, for instance, said they are ready to swap sharp but temporary cuts to federal agencies, known as the sequester, for permanent “structural changes” to federal health programs long sought by Republicans (Montgomery, 10/30).

Los Angeles Times: Budget Talks To Ward Off Another Shutdown Begin
The panel, created from this month’s budget agreement, has until Dec. 13 to negotiate a budget framework. Funding to keep the federal government open runs out by Jan. 15. Republicans resisted new taxes, saying they would rather reduce spending on Medicare and other safety-net programs. Democrats want wealthy individuals and corporations to contribute more tax revenue to help solve the nation’s fiscal problems (Mascaro, 10/30).

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

eHealth CEO Says His Company Can Run Healthcare.gov While It's Being Fixed

The health law’s policy ramifications make news as eHealth’s CEO offers to take over the troubled healthcare.gov, and other groups consider the coverage their workers — including some part-timers — receive. Also, business groups get new lawmaker allies in their fight to delay a health law tax on insurance.

Los Angeles Times: eHealth CEO To Obama: Let Us Take Over Healthcare.gov
eHealth Inc., the nation’s largest online seller of health insurance, is offering to run Obamacare enrollment for the federal government while the balky healthcare.gov website is being fixed. Gary Lauer, chief executive of eHealth, said in a letter this week to President Obama that his Mountain View, Calif., company was willing to operate the federal exchange through its website as a temporary stopgap to give officials more time to repair the troubled online marketplace (Terhune, 10/30).

The Wall Street Journal: Some Factories Stick With Old Health Plans
Some small manufacturers facing soaring costs for employee health insurance say they are likely to continue coverage for their workers, even though they won’t be required to under the Affordable Care Act. They are wary of discontinuing coverage and sending their employees to new insurance exchanges to obtain their own insurance. They say the problem-filled rollout of the federal government’s online insurance market has raised further doubts about whether their employees would have access to sufficient coverage at lower costs (Tita, 10/30).

The Richmond Times-Dispatch: Obamacare Prompts Cutbacks For School Part-Timers
The health care reform law championed by President Barack Obama and Democrats in Congress is prompting Richmond-area school divisions to cut part-timers’ hours. Henrico and Chesterfield counties and Richmond schools have already established policies that limit part-time workers to less than 30 hours per week to avoid paying for their health insurance. Hanover County school officials are considering setting a cutoff (Shulleeta, 10/31).

The Hill: Business Groups Call For Repeal Of Obamacare Insurance Tax
Two groups of business associations and state and local chambers of Commerce are calling on Congress to pass new legislation that would delay an Obamacare tax on health insurance companies for two years. This week, Reps. Charles Boustany (R-La.) and Ami Bera (D-Calif.) proposed a bill delaying the tax for two years. The tax is expected to collect anywhere from $8 billion to $15 billion per year over the next few years (Kasperowicz, Ǫ/30).

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Senate Democrat To Offer Bill Allowing Americans To Keep Their Insurance Plan — If They Like It

Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., will offer a bill to keep President Barack Obama’s promise that under the health care law Americans could keep the health insurance they had if they liked it. Elsewhere, lawmakers on Capitol Hill have until Thursday afternoon to sort out if they have to make their staffs get coverage on the D.C. health exchange.

Politico: Landrieu To Propose Saving Vanishing Health Plans
Sen. Mary Landrieu said Wednesday she would propose legislation to ensure all Americans could keep their existing insurance coverage under Obamacare, a fresh sign of the political problems the law’s rollout has created for congressional Democrats. Landrieu, a Democrat who faces a tough reelection in Louisiana in 2ዎ, said she would either offer her own bill or formally sign onto another measure that would ensure that the law would not force anyone off of their existing health policies. “The promise was made, and it should be kept,” Landrieu said in the Capitol Wednesday. “And it was our understanding when we voted for that bill that people when they have insurance could keep with what they had. So I’m going to be working on that fix” (Raju, 10/30). 

Politico: Democrats Differ On Putting Hill Aides On Exchanges
An informal survey of Democrats in both chambers shows there is simply no consensus on how to implement vague guidance on whether to put thousands of Capitol Hill denizens on the District’s DC Health Link exchange or keep aides on the Federal Employee Health Benefits Program. Undecideds don’t have much time to put the politically charged issue behind them: The deadline is Thursday afternoon for lawmakers to make the final decision (Everett and Sherman, 10/31).

Powered by WPeMatico

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS