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Daily Archives: January 25, 2018

Podcast: ‘What The Health?’ CHIP (Finally) Gets Funded

Three and a half months after funding expired for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, CHIP is finally refinanced, this time for six years. That was one of several health policies attached to the short-term spending bill Congress passed Monday, which reopened the federal government after a weekend shutdown.

The spending bill also delayed — again — several unpopular health care taxes that are intended to help fund the Affordable Care Act, including the “Cadillac tax” on very generous health plans.

This week€™s “What The Health?” panelists are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Joanne Kenen of Politico, Alice Ollstein of Talking Points Memo and Paige Winfield Cunningham of The Washington Post.

In addition to those topics, they discuss new leadership at the Department of Health and Human Services, after the Senate confirmed Alex Azar to lead the agency, and efforts by religious conservatives at HHS to make it easier for health workers to decline to participate in abortions, physician-assisted death or other controversial health procedures.

Among the takeaways from this week€™s podcast:

  • Now that Congress has funded the Childrenâs Health Insurance Program, health care advocates are lining up to push for funding for community health centers, which serve about 1 in 12 Americans and ran out of federal funding on Oct. 1.
  • At the same time, the bipartisan effort in the Senate to pass legislation to stabilize the ACA’s marketplaces seems to be losing steam.
  • The new HHS rule that protects workers who have conscientious objections to services — such as providing birth control, treating transgender patients or performing abortions — duplicates protections that were already contained in state and federal laws.

Plus, for “extra credit,” the panelists recommend their favorite health stories of the week they think you should read, too.

Julie Rovner: Politico’s €œThe religious activists on the rise inside Trump’s health department,” by Dan Diamond.

Joanne Kenen: Dallas News’ “Bishop Lynch High School having online school Thursday and Friday due to flu outbreak,€ by Dana Branham.

Alice Ollstein: The Washington Postâs “Trumps 24-year-old drug policy appointee to step down by month’s end,” by Robert O’Harrow Jr.

Paige Winfield Cunningham: The Texas Tribune, “Dangerous Deliveries: Is Texas doing enough to stop moms from dying?” by Marissa Evans and Chris Essig.

To hear all our podcasts, click here.

And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunes, Stitcher or Google Play.

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Viewpoints: Even In The U.S., Extreme Poverty Takes Toll On Public Health; Medicaid Changes ‘Are Not Reform’

Editorial pages feature thoughts on these topics as well as other health care issues.

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Perspectives: ‘Wisdom’ Needed For Treating Opioid Epidemic; The Other ‘Pressing Problem’: Tobacco

Opinion writers express views on the opioid crisis, how to help those who are addicted and what lessons can be applied to another dangerous substance: tobacco.

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Longer Looks: Flu Season; Income Inequality; And Orlando’s Air Quality

Each week, KHN’s Shefali Luthra finds interesting reads from around the Web.

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State Highlights: Minn. Unveils Plan To Accelerate Elder Abuse Investigations; Viral Video Of Discharged Baltimore Woman Draws Federal Attention

Media outlets report on news from Minnesota, Maryland, California, North Carolina, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Texas, Ohio, Georgia and Arizona.

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Hospitals Just Don’t Seem To Want To Budge From Those Standard Uncomfortable Gowns

Lots of other options exist, but the standard gown doesn’t seem to be going anywhere anytime soon. In other public health news: lessons learned from the latest Alzheimer’s drug failure, exercise, stem cell research, cancer warnings on coffee, anti-seizure medication and getting healthy before surgery.

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First Cloned Monkeys Offer Hope For Medical Breakthroughs In Humans

Scientists recently cleared the hurdle of cloning primates, and because monkey clones can be genetically altered, one gene at a time, with techniques such as CRISPR. researchers will be able to better study the effects of diseases such as cancer, Parkinson’s, metabolic disorders and more. Some worry, however, that it takes us one step closer to cloning humans.

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It’s Not Just Aches And A Fever You Have To Worry About — The Flu Can Also Trigger A Heart Attack

Although doctors have long-noticed a trend of an increase in heart attacks during flu season, a new study links an increased rick of a cardiac event with the virus. Updates on the flu come out of Illinois, Kansas and Oregon, as well.

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Research Upends Long-Held Belief That There’s A Narrow Time Window To Remove Stroke Patients’ Clots

Before doctors thought that anything after six hours was too late to do any good. But a new study found that’s not the case.

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Agencies Cracking Down On ‘Unscrupulous Vendors’ Selling Treatments To ‘Cure’ Opioid Addiction

Eleven companies were sent warning letters for the language they used to market their products, including “break the killer pain habit” and “relieve your symptoms . . . addiction, withdrawal, cravings.â Meanwhile, senators say they expect to funnel more money into fighting the opioid crisis, but it’s not clear yet on how much that will be.

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